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Pictures of the fifth part of our Indonesia trip in Sulawesi (without Toraja-Land)

 

latest picture: June 27, 2007

  • click a picture to see details
  • the colored numbers of the pictures are corresponding with the map of the above mentioned link in the same color
More websites from Indonesia and Timor-Leste:

 
On November 21st, 2006, we left the Island of Borneo after half a year, where we overhauled completely our car and visited the Malaysian provinces of Sarawak and Sabah and two new countries – Brunei (# 154) and in Kalimantan the "begin" of Indonesia (# 155) –, driving a total of 3'258 miles. Two days later, we arrived on a domestic ferry in Jakarta, the capital of Indonesia, a mega-city of about 17 million people on the island of Java. Then, a whole range of more Indonesian islands followed: Sumatra to the West and Bali, Lombok, Sumbawa, Rinca with the Komodo Dragons, Flores, Sumba and Timor to the East. In-between we explored the 156th country – Timor-Leste –, before our Indonesian roundtrip continued in Sulawesi and ended finally in Kalimantan on the Island of Borneo.
 
 
 
 
 
 
01   Very unusual in Indonesia: The
„KMP Belida“, sailing from Labuhanbajo
in Flores to Bira in Sulawesi has only one
car on board on June 12th: Our
LandCruiser! It is our 12th ferry
journey in Indonesian waters
02   Traditional boat builders are
at work in the South coastal
village of Tanah Beru between
Bira and Bulukumba
03   Colorful houses on stilts are
plentiful on the South Coast,
like here behind a maize
field between Bira and Makassar
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
04   The restored Fort Rotterdam
that once guarded the harbor of
Makassar, shows its distinguished
Dutch architecture
05   The towering Mandala
Monument in Makassar is
fascinating in its architecture
too. Unfortunately it is not
possible anymore to ascend
to the viewing platform
06   Rice is the main diet of the
Indonesian people. It is sold in
different qualities. A bag of
55 pounds costs around
45’000 Rupiahs = 5 US$
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
How are Indonesians earning their livelihood?
07   Tire inflator in Makassar:
A handy and fast service along the
roads, generated by a small generator
08   Fruit street vendor in Makassar:
In the tropical heat, fresh fruit is
always appreciated by by-passers
09   Bird releaser in Makassar:
For only 1’000 Rupees (10 US cents)
two birds are released from their cages
into freedom (and probably caught
soon after again!)
 
 
 
 
 
 
How are Indonesians earning their livelihood?
10   Weaver in Bira:
A weaver is working under her wooden
house on stilts. The click-clack of
her loom attracted our attention
11   Rice planters in the Southern plains:
Three women are bundling rice for
replanting. The scene remembers
us of Vietnam
12   Sea grass cultivators on the South coast:
The sea grass takes six month to grow until
it can be harvested. It is dried and then
exported to Japan and China, apparently
for processing jelly
 
 
 
 
 
 
13   Northeast of Makassar, we pass
again many rice fields. They spread right
to the road, to the houses and to the
karst mountains – similar to Japan and
Vietnam. Each foot of the soil is cultivated
14   Charming wooden houses with
small balconies always attract our
attention. It is interesting that – like
in Vietnam – most of the time only
the front wall is finished attractively
15   We are approaching Toraja land
that is situated about 200 miles North
of Makassar, where it is getting hillier
and where deep down in the valley we
can follow brown jungle rivers that
meander lazily through the greenery
 
 
 
 
 
Continuation:
Pictures from Tana Toraja (Toraja Land)
in Sulawesi from June 27, to July 7, 2007
 
 
 
 
16   The entrance gate to Tana Toraja near
Mebali – the Toraja land – is greeting us
with the replica of a traditional Toraja
house. From this very moment, this
fascinating unique architecture is
accompanying us continuously
 
68   In Pendolo, on the South bank
of Lake Poso, we spend a night and
reverse our plans: Instead of continuing
North through boring landscape, we
turn back to the South
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
69   A red dragonfly is resting
on a grass stem .....
70   ..... a red tropical flower
is blooming in the forest .....
71   ..... a red cacao fruit is
hanging from its tree
 
 
 
 
 
 
72   Everything that needs to dry is
spread out on the sides of the road.
Here it is vanilla on the road
between Parepare and Polewali
73   A rustically “Warung” (small shop)
along the Mamasa mountain road
74   One of the villages nestling along the
55 miles of very rough road to Mamasa
– another traditional region like Tana
Toraja
. We needed one hour for
7 miles, what made us turn back
 
 
 
 
 
 
75   The fruit of the Kapok tree
produces a ball of white soft „cotton“
76   From Mangkutana, a 4’000 ft. high
pass leads from South to Central Sulawesi,
giving view to a spectacular waterfall
77   A fishing boat is leaving the river
in Parepare at sunset
 
 
 
 
 
 
78   Women are harvesting rice. Rice
fields dominate a substantial part
of Sulawesi’s landscape .....
79   ..... and spread a
peaceful atmosphere
80   A colony of ducks enjoy one of
the many rivers crisscrossing the Island
– not caring about bird flue
 
 
 
 
 
 
81   View over a river with jungle, palm trees
and sand banks along the West Coast of
the youngest Indonesian province of West-
Sulawesi, between Majene and Mamuju
82   Mamuju is greeting in the warm
evening light before our heavily
loaded ferry leaves West-Sulawesi
for East-Kalimantan .....
83   ..... and we bid farewell
to beautiful Sulawesi
 
 
 
Continuation: Pictures from the sixth part of our Indonesian trip in Kalimantan (Borneo) from July 14, 2007, onwards
 
 
 
Articles in newspapers about us in Indonesia:
Article: "Tamu Istimewa: Neverending Journey", Monthly Car Magazine "Jip", January 2007
Article: "Toyota FJ60 1982 World Travelers", Monthly Car Magazine "Jip",  February 2007
Article: "CHEESE LAND CRUISER", Monthly Car Magazine "BBC Top Gear", February 2007
Article: "22 Tahun Jelajahi 156 Negara", Daily Newspaper "Post Metro Balikpapan", July 17, 2007